Month: October 2017

That's the kind of rescuing Jesus does. It's complete and final. Anything else is hogwash.

Book Recommendation | Lu by Beth Troy

All the stories have been written, including mine.

It’s a great first line, because it’s a strong statement that sounds true, in the same way as the famous opening line to Pride and Prejudice sounds true … until you think about it. Because we’re all unique, so our stories are also unique.

Although our stories also have some common elements:

I thought I’d finished writing that story years ago, but then yesterday’s story happened—the one about the boy who cheats and the girl who leaves. You could dress it up and call it a journey. But there was nothing new in the story about the girl who went home because she had nowhere else to go.

I know not everyone enjoys novels written in first person, but I do—especially when the character has a strong and interesting voice, as Lu (short for Louisa) does.

So Lu is home, with a car that barely runs, a 1970’s crockpot, and no money. She finds a job at the local newspaper, where she is asked to write wedding features. And she befriends the young preacher, back in town after his divorce. Lu isn’t sure if she believes in God and she certainly isn’t following him, despite having been raised in church.

Jackson challenges Lu to come to church, and she does. He’s preaching a series on the Book of Ecclesiastes, which brought him through his own tough time when his wife left him. These sermons start Lu on her own faith journey, reading the Bible and trying to understand what Jackson sees in Jesus. At the same time, she’s developing feelings for Jackson … all the while knowing nothing can come of those feelings if they don’t share a faith, and Jackson isn’t going to change.

Lu isn’t typical Christian fiction.

The characters drink alcohol and swear. Lu has been living with her boyfriend, and Jackson is divorced. Yet there is a lot more Christian content than in most Christian novels I read, and it feels natural, not forced. I liked the way the novel showed Lu’s faith journey warts and all, and that the focus was on finding Jesus for herself.

My one complaint about Lu was that it ended too soon. There was a clear ending to the main plot—Lu’s faith journey—but not to the main subplot. This annoyed me at first, but in hindsight it was the right decision. I only hope that dangling thread means there is a sequel in the works.

Thanks to the author for providing a free ebook for review.

You can find Beth Troy online at:

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

About Lu

“There’s great hope where the road meets the sky – maybe even an answer. But this road leads home. Just home. I thought I’d finished writing that story years ago, but then yesterday’s story happened – the one about the boy who cheats and the girl who leaves.”
Lu Sokolowski never planned to return to her small hometown of Dunlap’s Creek, but it’s the only place she can think of to go after her boyfriend cheats on her. Moving back in with her family lets her run away from her problems, but it also means suffering their attempts to reassemble her failed life, including arranging a job as the wedding beat writer at the local paper and setting her up with Jackson, the divorced pastor of her family’s church. Unexpected success and friendships restore Lu to the family and faith she’d left behind. But when the small-town life Lu never intended shakes up, will she run again?
Lu’s story is a journey of a woman back to her family, her faith, and herself. It’s about second chances and the unchosen circumstances that press the point of who we are and what we believe. Are we the sum of our successes and failures, or does our identity rest in a greater hope?

Find Lu online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Amazon UKGoodreads

Who is your favourite non-romance Christian author?

Bookish Question #31: Who is your favourite non-romance Christian author?

Last week I asked who is your favourite Christian romance author … and gave a vague reply. I’m going to do the same this week.

Only this week, I’m asking who is your favourite non-romance Christian author.

In the last few months I’ve enjoyed books in a range of genres:

  • Legal thrillers, from authors such as Cara Putman and Rachel Dylan.
  • Medical thrillers from authors such as Lisa Harris and Lynne Gentry, and Richard Mabry.
  • Dystopian fiction from Vanetta Chapman and Sara Ella.
  • Science fiction from Adam David Collings.
  • Speculative fiction from James L Rubart.
  • Historical fiction from Lynn Austin.
  • Dual timeline fiction from Heidi Chiavaroli and Michele Phoenix.
  • Women’s fiction from authors such as Catherine West, Elizabeth Musser, Beth Troy, and Christine Dillon.

These are some of my favourite non-romance authors.

Because choosing a favourite depends on what genre I’m in the mood to read. And it’s like choosing a favourite child, or favourite flavour of Krispy Kreme donut. It can’t be done.

Who is your favourite non-romance Christian author?

All the stories have been written, including mine.

First Line Friday | Week 14 | Lu by Beth Troy

It’s Friday, which means it’s time to open the book nearest you and share the first line

Today I’m sharing from Lu by Beth Troy:

All the stories have been written, including mine.

Intriguing! I enjoy first person novels, especially when the voice is as interesting as Lu promises to be.

About Lu

“There’s great hope where the road meets the sky – maybe even an answer. But this road leads home. Just home. I thought I’d finished writing that story years ago, but then yesterday’s story happened – the one about the boy who cheats and the girl who leaves.”
Lu Sokolowski never planned to return to her small hometown of Dunlap’s Creek, but it’s the only place she can think of to go after her boyfriend cheats on her. Moving back in with her family lets her run away from her problems, but it also means suffering their attempts to reassemble her failed life, including arranging a job as the wedding beat writer at the local paper and setting her up with Jackson, the divorced pastor of her family’s church. Unexpected success and friendships restore Lu to the family and faith she’d left behind. But when the small-town life Lu never intended shakes up, will she run again?
Lu’s story is a journey of a woman back to her family, her faith, and herself. It’s about second chances and the unchosen circumstances that press the point of who we are and what we believe. Are we the sum of our successes and failures, or does our identity rest in a greater hope?

Find Lu online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Amazon UKGoodreads

Click the button to check out what my fabulous fellow FirstLineFriday bloggers are sharing today:

Yes, rather each blogger listing each of the other bloggers—which is getting to be a longer and longer list each month—we’ve got our own site. It’s just sharing FirstLineFriday posts for now, but who knows what the future holds?

And you can click here to check out my previous FirstLineFriday posts.

Share your first line in the comments, and happy reading!

This is the story of my feeble attempts to make sense of my life

Book Recommendation | The Secret Life of Sarah Hollenbeck by Bethany Turner

Wow! Wow! Wow!

I’ve read a lot of books this year—some good, some great—but few that I want to read again. Right. Now. The Secret Life of Sarah Hollenbeck is one.

Sarah McDermott divorces her high school sweetheart-husband after he cheats on her, and goes back to being Sarah Hollenbeck. Only she has no idea who Sarah Hollenbeck is, because she’s been the trophy wife for so long. She joins a book club, writes bad poetry, quits book club, and writes a naughty novel under the pen name of Raine de Bourgh. The novel goes immediately to the top of all the bestseller charts, as do the two sequels (because, donchaknow, that’s what happens to all debut novelists? Not).

And then Sarah Hollenbeck becomes a Christian. She says:

This book could be a detailed story of how my best friend led me to the Lord. It’s a good story … but that isn’t the story I need to tell. This is the story of my feeble attempts to make sense of my life.

Sarah realises she can’t write naughty novels any more. Instead, she joins her one remaining friend at church, where she immediately develops an inappropriate crush on the first guy she meets. Who happens to be the pastor. The married pastor. With a daughter. Oops.

I was picturing myself in his arms and imagining how his lips would feel on mine. And then I remembered that I was in church and that I had become a Christ-follower on Monday.

Fortunately for Sarah, the pastor turns out not to be married but widowed (fortunately for Sarah. Ben is somewhat taken aback at the thought of dating the notorious Raine de Bourgh, but he copes (lol). It’s interesting to watch their relationship unfold, because Ben’s first marriage was everything Sarah’s wasn’t.

Sarah decides to write Christian fiction, so reads some of what’s on sale:

The books I read didn’t feel realistic. At least, they weren’t my reality. Then again, my reality was messed up, so maybe I wasn’t the best judge.

I’ve had a lot of conversations along the same lines—too much Christian fiction doesn’t feel realistic (I’m not counting the suspense genre here. I’m perfectly happy for my reality not to include dead bodies and stalkers, and I’ll trust those authors are presenting their information accurately).

Sarah goes on to make another point that’s recently come up in my reading and freelance editing (yes, I’m a freelance fiction editor specialising in Christian romance): how the women in the books don’t seem to feel desire or temptation. Yes, I’d noticed that as well. In fact, I’ve read Christian romances where the hero and heroine had all the romantic attraction of siblings (that has even more of a yuck factor than a sex scene). I don’t want lots of hot-and-heavy in Christian fiction, but there needs to be some sexual attraction. Otherwise it’s not realistic.

I loved the humor.

There’s a scene where Sarah shares some poetry with her book club. Most are politely complimentary. One woman is not:

What’s with the subjects? It’s like you just flipped through the yellow pages until something jumped out at you. What’s next? Exterminators?
I looked at the papers in my hands and sheepishly shuffled “Insecticide Nuclear Winter” to the bottom of the stack.

And she (Sarah Hollenbeck? Bethany Turner? Both?) has great taste in actors:

Can you believe I couldn’t even get Martin Freeman to give me Benedict Cumberbatch’s phone number?

Yeah. I’ve got to read this again.

Recommended for fans of contemporary romance with humour, from authors such as Kara Isaac, Beth Troy, Becky Wade, and Melissa Tagg.

Thanks to Baker Publishing and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

About The Secret Life of Sarah Hollenbeck

Becoming a Christian is the best and worst thing that has ever happened to Sarah Hollenbeck. Best because, well, that’s obvious. Worst because, up to this point, she’s made her very comfortable living as a well-known, bestselling author of steamy romance novels that would leave the members of her new church blushing. Now Sarah is trying to reconcile her past with the future she’s chosen. She’s still under contract with her publisher and on the hook with her enormous fan base for the kind of book she’s not sure she can write anymore. She’s beginning to think that the church might frown on her tithing on royalties from a “scandalous” book. And the fact that she’s falling in love with her pastor doesn’t make things any easier.
With a powerful voice, penetrating insight, and plenty of wit, Bethany Turner explodes onto the scene with a debut that isn’t afraid to deal with the thorny realities of living the Christian life.

Find The Secret Life of Sarah Hollenbeck online at:

Amazon US | Amazon UK | Amazon AU

ChristianBook | Goodreads

About Bethany Turner

Bethany TurnerBethany Turner has been writing since the second grade, when she won her first writing award for her essay explaining why, if she could have lunch with any person throughout history, she would choose John Stamos. Do-gooders all around her chose Reagan, Thatcher and Gorbachev, but it was Bethany’s ode to Uncle Jesse which walked away with the prize. More than 25 years later, her writing is still infused with pop culture and off-the-beaten-track ideas.

Bethany is a born and bred Kentucky girl who relocated to Colorado in 2001, three years after meeting the love of her life in a chat room, back before anyone knew that wasn’t always a good idea. Thankfully, it worked out in this case, and she and her husband are the proud parents of two boys. In 2014 Bethany walked away from her career as a bank vice president to step out in faith as a writer. Since then, God has not only opened doors in the publishing world, but has also called her to full-time ministry serving on a church staff. She is an innovative systems administrator for a rural church that is passionate about reaching the unchurched.

Find Bethany Turner online at:

Website | BookBub | FacebookInstagram | Pinterest | Twitter

Read the introduction to The Secret Life of Sarah Hollenbeck below:

Book Recommendation | The Dishonorable Miss DeLancey by Carolyn Miller

It is a truth universally acknowledged that all romance novels since Jane Austen are mere copies.

Well, not really. As we know, we are all unique, so our journeys to love are also unique. But many romance novels do offer a conscious or subconscious nod to Austen’s work, and The Dishonourable Miss DeLancey is no exception.

At five-and-twenty, Miss DeLancey is close to being on the shelf. Her marital prospects are not helped by a mama who combines Mrs Bennett’s silliness with Lady Catherine’s snobbery, a brother who has gambled away her dowry, and a father who reminded me of Mr Bennett: intelligent and personable, but influenced by his wife. There are also echoes of Persuasion in the decorated sea captain who was rejected in love when a lowly lieutenant.

Carolyn Miller takes these well-known tropes and gives them new life in The Dishonourable Miss DeLancey, the final book in her Legacy of Grace series—and the best (well, in my view).

Miss DeLancey had the misfortune to fall for someone who didn’t return her regard, and was then humiliated for it. It didn’t help that her brother gambled away her dowry, making it difficult for her to find another suitor. (Yes, there were several times when I thought Richard DeLancey needed to take a long walk off a short pier.)

Ben Kemsley has his own problems. He’s spent most of his prize money caring for the families of the men he captained, especially those who didn’t make it back to England. The Prince Regent has promised him a reward, but Prinny is famously self-centred and how exactly does one ask the Prince of Wales for a promised fortune?

My favourite aspect of Clara DeLancey’s story was the focus on her spiritual journey.

In fact, that was the major focus of the first half of the novel. Clara’s turning point comes when she realises there is more to Christianity than church. She sees the need to change from the dissatisfied person she had been—and the need to put that change in God’s hands. Fortunately, she has her new friends to guide her … new friends with a handsome brother.

I also enjoyed the references to the marine chronometer. I read Longtitude by Dava Sobel many years ago. She explained that we’ve been able to calculate latitude through the position of the stars and sun, calculating longtitude accurately meant having an accurate clock—and one that could remain accurate throughout a long ocean voyage.

I love this kind of mix of fact and fiction, because it was the lack of such a clock caused the shipwreck that made Captain Ben Kemsley a minor Regency celebrity. There were also several scenes set in and around the famed Brighton Pavillion, redecorated by the Prince Regent at great expense and with dubious taste, and I enjoyed this as well.

Overall, an excellent Christian Regency romance with element of suspense. Recommended!

Thanks to Kregel Publications for sending me a free paperback to review.

About Carolyn Miller

Carolyn MillerCarolyn Miller lives in the beautiful Southern Highlands of New South Wales, Australia. She is married, with four gorgeous children, who all love to read (and write!).

A longtime lover of Regency romance, Carolyn’s novels have won a number of Romance Writers of American (RWA) and American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) contests. She is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers and Australasian Christian Writers. Her favourite authors are classics like Jane Austen (of course!), Georgette Heyer, and Agatha Christie, but she also enjoys contemporary authors like Susan May Warren and Becky Wade.

Her stories are fun and witty, yet also deal with real issues, such as dealing with forgiveness, the nature of really loving versus ‘true love’, and other challenges we all face at different times.

Find Carolyn Miller online at:

Website | Facebook | Google+

Goodreads| Pinterest | Twitter

About The Dishonorable Miss DeLancey

Will a damaged reputation and desire for society’s approval thwart the legacy of grace?
Tainted by scandal and forced to leave London for the quieter Brighton countryside, the Honorable Miss Clara DeLancey is a shadow of her former society self. She’s lost the man she loved to another and, in a culture that has no patience for self-pity, is struggling with depression. A chance encounter brings her a healing friendship with the sisters of an injured naval captain. But Clara’s society mama is appalled at the new company she’s keeping.

Captain Benjamin Kemsley is not looking for a wife. But his gallant spirit won’t let him ignore the penniless viscount’s daughter–not when she so obviously needs assistance to keep moving forward from day to day. Can he protect his heart and still keep her safe?

When they’re pushed into the highest echelons of society at the Prince Regent’s Brighton Pavilion, this mismatched couple must decide if family honor is more important than their hopes. Can they right the wrongs of the past and find future happiness together–without finances, family support, or royal favor?

Find The Dishonorable Miss DeLancey online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AUAmazon UK 

ChristianBook | Goodreads

Bookish Question #30: Who is your favourite Christian romance author?

Bookish Question #30: Who is your favourite Christian romance author?

Yes, I know.

Asking you to name your favourite Christian romance author is like asking you to choose a favourite child or grandchild. It’s impossible.

If you’re anything like me, it depends on your mood at the time someone asks the question.

Sometimes I need to read something funny.

If so, I’m going to suggest authors like Kara Isaac, Beth Troy, Bethany Turner, Jen Turano, or Karen Witemeyer.

Other times, I’ll be in the mood for something with a little more depth. In that case, I might turn to Courtney Walsh, Carolyn Miller, or Denise Hunter.

Sometimes I’ll want a specific genre or trope: Regency romance (Kristi Ann Hunter), mail order bride (Nerys Leigh), speculative utopian (Keely Brooke Keith), or Victorian village (Julie Klassen).

And some days, if you ask me who my favourite Christian romance author is, it will be the author of whichever book I’ve just finished or reviewed (because writing the review reminds me of the book all over again). Ask me again in a week, and it will be someone else.

What about you? Who is your favourite Christian romance author?

The Honorable Miss Clara DeLancey ...

First Line Friday | Week 13 |The Dishonorable Miss DeLancey

It’s Friday, which means it’s time to open the book nearest you and share the first line!

Today I’m sharing from The Dishonorable Miss DeLancey by Carolyn Miller

The Honorable Clara DeLancey stood atop the chalky cliffs. Above her, heavy clouds menaced the moon, revealing then concealing the scene below.

Okay, so that’s actually the first two lines—because those first two lines match the cover so well, and because it made me want to keep reading! (Which, surely, is the purpose of the first line.)

About The Dishonorable Miss DeLancey

Will a damaged reputation and desire for society’s approval thwart the legacy of grace?
Tainted by scandal and forced to leave London for the quieter Brighton countryside, the Honorable Miss Clara DeLancey is a shadow of her former society self. She’s lost the man she loved to another and, in a culture that has no patience for self-pity, is struggling with depression. A chance encounter brings her a healing friendship with the sisters of an injured naval captain. But Clara’s society mama is appalled at the new company she’s keeping.

Captain Benjamin Kemsley is not looking for a wife. But his gallant spirit won’t let him ignore the penniless viscount’s daughter–not when she so obviously needs assistance to keep moving forward from day to day. Can he protect his heart and still keep her safe?

When they’re pushed into the highest echelons of society at the Prince Regent’s Brighton Pavilion, this mismatched couple must decide if family honor is more important than their hopes. Can they right the wrongs of the past and find future happiness together–without finances, family support, or royal favor?

Find The Dishonorable Miss DeLancey online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Amazon UK | ChristianBook | Goodreads

Click the button to check out what my fabulous fellow FirstLineFriday bloggers are sharing today:

Yes, rather each blogger listing each of the other bloggers—which is getting to be a longer and longer list each month—we’ve got our own site. It’s just sharing FirstLineFriday posts for now, but who knows what the future holds?

And you can click here to check out my previous FirstLineFriday posts.

Share your first line in the comments, and happy reading!

Theirs was a case of David versus Goliath, and in battles like that, the honorable people were supposed to persevere until they finally won.

Book Review | A Dangerous Legacy by Elizabeth Camden

I am a big fan of Elizabeth Camden’s novels.

She has a unique ability to find lesser-known historical events or situations, and build a novel around them. A Dangerous Legacy includes the politcal background to the buiding of the first Panama Canal, PTSD, and the invention of the plumbing valve which enables us to have water pressure in multi-storey buildings. It also includes the slightly more familiar telegraph operators, and the necessity for British peers to marry American heiresses to shore up their crumbling estates.

Lucy Drake is a telegraph operator for upstart American news agency Associated Press. Sir Colin Beckwith is the manager of Reuters, AP’s rival. He’s one of those impoverished British gentlemen looking for a heiress, and Lucy is not a heiress. Her side of the Drake family lost control of their revolutionary water valve, and their legal battle is ongoing.

But Lucy and Colin keep getting thrown together, and they become allies of sorts after each finds out an awkward secret about the other. But neither of them realise how dangerous finding the truth will be, to their lives, their sanity, and their hearts.

Colin was a great hero.

He’s willing to do the right thing even at a personal cost to himself. He’s British through and through, almost the perfect gentleman. And Lucy was my favorite type of heroine—intelligent, independent, and hard-working. They made a great couple. I loved their conversations and banter, and wanted them to be together. It was r good to see their romance build bit by bit as they got to know each other.

A Dangerous Legacy had a lot more suspense than I was expecting, but I’m a romantic suspense fan so that worked for me! It certainly made the novel hard to put down.

Recommended for fans of Deeanne Gist, especially her later books which are solid historical romance but without an overt Christian element. A Dangerous Legacy had a few time-appropriate nods to Christianity, but the faith aspect wasn’t even a minor plot point.

Thanks to Bethany House and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

About A Dangerous Legacy

Lucy Drake’s mastery of Morse code has made her a valuable asset to the American news agencies as a telegrapher. But the sudden arrival of Sir Colin Beckwith at rival British news agency Reuters puts her hard-earned livelihood at risk. Newly arrived from London, Colin is talented, handsome, and insufferably charming.

Despite their rivalry, Lucy realizes Colin’s connections could be just what her family needs to turn the tide of their long legal battle over the fortune they were swindled out of forty years ago. When she negotiates an unlikely alliance with him, neither of them realizes how far the web of treachery they’re wading into will take them.

Find A Dangerous Legacy online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Amazon UK
ChristianBook | Goodreads | Koorong

About Elizabeth Camden

Elizabeth Camden is a research librarian at a small college in central Florida. Her novels have won the coveted RITA and Christy Awards. She has published several articles for academic publications and is the author of four nonfiction history books. Her ongoing fascination with history and love of literature have led her to write inspirational fiction. Elizabeth lives with her husband near Orlando, Florida.

Find Elizabeth Camden online at:

Website | Facebook

Read the introduction to A Dangerous Legacy below:

Book Review | Dr. Colbert’s Keto Zone Diet

Okay, so I mostly review fiction, not diet books.

But New Zealand is coming into summer, and I have mysteriously acquired several kilos over the winter (one kilo equals a little over two pounds). Why is it the one thing we want to lose is the thing that’s so difficult to lose?

I have read a lot of diet books over the years. Most start by extolling the health benefits of their particular eating plan, which is always convincing. Okay, so most of them sensibly focus on the importance of prioritising fresh fruit and vegetables over processed food (as an aside, this is one of my biggest issues with a lot of vegan and vegetarian food—it’s highly processed. I can’t believe eating a highly processed GM soy product is can be healthier than eating grass-fed meat, or ocean-caught fish).

Typical diet books then move onto the specifics of the eating plan, complete with recipes. And that’s where the ones I’ve read fall down: the recipes are usually for a family of, but I’m the only one on the diet. Yes, I guess the logic of the four-person recipes is that no one wants to cook themselves separate food to the rest of the family. But it means that the diet recipes have to suit everyone in the family … and they never do. I’ve tried.

The Keto Zone Diet is the same, but different.

Yes, preaches the benefits of the keto eating plan, it emphasises fresh food, and it includes a handful of recipes. But it’s not prescriptive, which means it’s easier to follow, and easier to integrate into a family.

What is a keto zone diet?

Put simply, the idea is that the low-fat and low-calorie diets dominating the industry don’t work (as anyone caught on the diet-weight gain treadmill knows). The Keto Zone diet is a variation of the famed Atkins diet, which focuses on losing weight by limiting carbohydrate intake and eating moderate amounts of fat. Fat makes us feel full, while limiting carbs help us not to feel hungry between meals.

In practice, this means no bread, pasta, rice, corn, cereals, potatoes, sugar, or alcohol, limited fruit and limited starchy vegetables (like sweet potatoes and beans). It means moderate protein and fat (e.g. meat, dairy, and nuts), and unlimited low-starch vegetables. He also emphasises the importance of using good fats (such as avocado oil, coconut oil, olive oil, or butter from grass-fed cows) not bad fats (such as canola oil or soybean oil).

That’s it.

And that’s what I like about the Keto Zone Diet.

It’s workable. I can cook and serve the whole family the same food. We just choose our proportions. I eat lots of vegetables, a little meat, and no pasta or potato.

It’s simple, it’s workable, and it’s sustainable.

I won’t go into the science—you can read the book for that. I recommend you do, because this diet does go against a lot of the mainstream dietary advice. If following a low-fat, high-carb diet works for you, then great. Go with it. But I feel constantly hungry on a low-fat diet. I lose weight, but gain it all back again (sound familiar?). I don’t get so hungry on a low-carb diet, which has to be a good thing. If I’m not hungry (and can withstand the temptation to eat when I’m not hungry), then it’s going to be easier to lose weight.

There are a handful of simple recipes at the end of The Keto Zone Diet book, with an emphasis on simple. They are all for one person (well, except for the mayo and seed bread, but both will keep).

It doesn’t matter that there aren’t many recipes.

The internet is full of #Keto options, including cauliflower rice, cauliflower hash browns, and cauliflower pizza base, and a bread substitute or pancakes made from egg and cream cheese (the pancakes are a little sweeter than my regular recipe, but that means I don’t need the maple syrup).

If you’re curious about the keto diet, then Dr. Colbert’s Keto Zone Diet is a good introduction. If you’re a keto ninja, then this probably isn’t the book for you—although it might be a good book to own in paperback, to show your unbelieving friends that there is some real medical science behind your diet.

Thanks to Revell and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

You can find Dr. Colbert’s Keto Zone Diet online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Amazon UK | ChristianBook | Goodreads | Koorong

You can read the introduction to Dr. Colbert’s Keto Zone Diet below:

Have you tried a keto diet? How did you find it?

What's your favourite Christian Fiction genre?

Bookish Question #29 | What’s your favourite Christian Fiction genre?

Christian fiction comes in a range of genres

I suspect there are Christian versions of most of the genres found in general market fiction (with the exception of erotica and gay romance, for obvious reasons).

Romance readers are especially well catered for in Christian fiction. The Christian fiction industry is dominated by romance and the endless variations thereof: Amish romance, contemporary romance, historical romance (especially western romance and mail order bride romance ), and romantic suspense. Romance also creeps in to other genres such as women’s fiction, mystery, thrillers, and speculative fiction.

Romance is my favourite genre.

Not Amish romance—I don’t see anything romantic in having a house full of children producing endless dirty laundry, and no hot water. Yes, I suffer from #FirstWorldProblems and #SuburbanMomProblems (I think I see a future blog post there). But most other genres of romance, contemporary or historical, first person or third person. Especially if they have a touch of humour.

I like romance because I like the happy-ever-after ending romance guarantees. It reminds me of the gospel: no matter what bad things happen, we know we’ll get our happy-ever-after in Jesus.

We have hope.

I also see Christian romance novels as an allegory of our relationship with Christ. We are His bride, so surely this is the ultimate romance?

Yes, my favourite genre is romance, but I read most genres of Christian fiction—it shares that underlying message of hope. And it’s why I tend not to like stories without a happy ending. They often have no hope, and that doesn’t reflect the Truth of the Bible.

What’s your favourite Christian fiction genre? Why?