First Line Friday

First Line Friday | Week 89 | Courting Mr Emerson by Melody Carlson

It’s First Line Friday! That means it’s time to pick up the nearest book and quote the first line. Today I’m sharing from Courting Mr Emerson by Melody Carlson:

First line from Courting Mr Emerson: George Emerson didn't need anybody. Or so he told himself as he carefully shaved with his straight-edged razor, just as he did seven days a week at exactly 7:07 each morning.

Yes, I know that’s two lines. But the second line is so good! How could I leave it out?

Most romance novels are about couples in their twenties or early thirties, so I’m intrigued by the idea of a romance novel with an older couple. Have you read Courting Mr Emerson? What did you think?

What’s the book nearest you, and what’s the first line?

About Courting Mr Emerson

When the fun-loving and spontaneous artist Willow West meets buttoned-up, retired English teacher George Emerson, it’s not exactly love at first sight. Though she does find the obsessive-compulsive man intriguing. Making it her mission to get him to loosen up and embrace life, she embarks on what seems like a lost cause–and finds herself falling for him in the process.

A confirmed bachelor, George vacillates between irritation and attraction whenever Willow is around–which to him seems like all too often. He’s not interested in expanding his horizons or making new friends; it just hurts too much when you lose them.

But as the summer progresses, George feels his defenses crumbling. The question is, will his change of heart be too late for Willow?

You can find Courting Mr Emerson online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | ChristianBook | Goodreads | Koorong

Click the button to check out what my fabulous fellow FirstLineFriday bloggers are sharing today:

You can then click the link which will take you to the master page of all this week’s #FirstLineFriday posts.

And you can click here to check out my previous FirstLineFriday posts.

Share your first line in the comments, and happy reading!

And don’t forget to click here to check out my Amazon shop for my top picks in Christian fiction!

Quote from Falling for You by Becky Wade

#ThrowbackThursday | Falling for You by Becky Wade

Falling for You is the second novel in the Bradford Sisters series, and it’s the story of an internationally famous model and a retired football star.

Here’s the Amazon description:

Famously beautiful model Willow Bradford is taking a temporary break from her hectic schedule to work as the innkeeper at her family’s small-town bed-and-breakfast. She was enjoying the peace of her hometown, Merryweather, Washington, right up until she came face-to-face with Corbin Stewart, the man she loves to hate. A thoughtful rule-follower by nature, Willow threw caution to the wind four years ago when she entrusted her heart to Corbin–and suffered the consequences when it all fell apart.

Former NFL quarterback Corbin is forceful, charming, and accustomed to getting what he wants . . . except where Willow Bradford is concerned. Unable to forget her, he’s never stopped regretting what happened between them. When their paths unexpectedly cross again, he’s determined to make her give him a second chance.

When a decades-old missing persons case finds Corbin and Willow working together, they’re forced to confront their past and who they’ve become–and whether they can risk falling for one another all over again.

My Thoughts

Injury has forced Corbin Stewart to retire from football. He’s bought a house in Shore Pine, Washington, to be near his only remaining family. What he didn’t know was that it also put him near ex-girlfriend Willow Bradford, now on a sabbatical from modelling, living in nearby Merryweather and managing her family B&B.

Charlotte Dixon, Corbin’s twelve-year-old niece, has discovered a family secret.

She’s convinced Willow Bradford will help her uncover the mystery behind the secret, and convinces Corbin to introduce her to Willow. Willow agrees to help, even though helping will bring her into too much contact with ex-boyfriend Corbin. Who is still devastatingly attractive, despite the way he broke up with her four years ago.

Falling for You follows the same pattern as True to You and the free prequel novella, Then Came You. It intersperses the present-day story with letters, emails, and text messages from the past and present. It’s a novel (!) way to tell a story, and it works as we see the past and present stories of Willow, Corbin, and others.

And it’s a strong story.

It’s the romance of two people who messed up years ago, and have to work out if there’s a way through that mess to find happiness. Part of that mess was because while Willow is and always has been a strong Christian, Corbin called himself a Christian but didn’t live the life (football star, remember?). He’s now become a Christian, but finding life hard.

Willow has her own problems with faith, and they are so deep-seated it actually takes her a while to realise they even exist. This, to me, was the depth in the book—Willow coming to terms with her past choices, and what that means for her faith. And there was a fascinating suspense plot around Charlotte’s secret.

I loved True to You because I related to Nora, the librarian. She’s bookish, and that meant I could relate to her in a way I can’t relate to an internationally famous model. But I could still relate to Willow as a woman who has made mistakes, who has to learn what forgiveness really means.

Falling for You is a touching tale of love lost and love found again, underpinned by an intriguing mystery, and the power of God to forgive.

Now I’m looking forward to the third book in the Bradford Sisters series, the story of the pastry chef who doesn’t realise her best friend of forever is in love with her (and has been forever). He knows it. I know it. Her sisters know it. But she doesn’t, and that’s a trope I love.

Thanks to Bethany House and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

About Becky Wade

Author Photo Becky WadeBecky is the Carol and Christy award winning author of heartwarming, humorous, and swoon-worthy contemporary inspirational romances.

During her childhood in California, Becky frequently produced homemade plays starring her sisters, friends, and cousins. These plays almost always featured a heroine, a prince, and a love story with a happy ending. She’s been a fan of all things romantic ever since.

These days, you’ll find Becky in Dallas, Texas failing to keep up with her housework, trying her best in yoga class, carting her three kids around town, watching TV with her Cavalier spaniel on her lap, hunched over her computer writing, or eating chocolate.

You can find Becky Wade online at:

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter

You can find Falling for You online at:

Amazon | ChristianBook | Goodreads | Koorong

You can read the introduction to Falling for You below:

How do you define Christian fiction?

Bookish Question #104 | How do you define Christian fiction?

I’ve actually written several longish blog posts on this. Rather than rehashing my entire train of thought, I’ll give you the highlights and link to my previous posts.

Fiction written by a Christian author may or may not be Christian fiction.

Christian authors may write for the general market, or for the Christian market. I don’t think you can classify fiction written for the general market as “Christian fiction” even if it’s written by a Christian and has underlying Christian values. That’s not what the market wants. Also, lots of books have underlying Christian values—even Star Wars. That doesn’t make Star Wars Christian fiction.

I’m sceptical of any “Christian fiction” that isn’t written by a Christian.

That, to me, is someone trying to cash in on a market segment, and I don’t think it’s honest. Yes, Christians can write general market fiction with underlying Christian values—that’s us being in the world but not of the world. But I don’t think non-Christians should be writing Christian fiction any more than I think Christians should be writing general market LGBTQIA erotica, or Islamic romance. It’s disrespectful and dishonest.

So I think Christian fiction is written by a Christian, and aimed at Christian readers.

It will reflect and reinforce mainstream Christian values and beliefs (e.g. the Apostle’s Creed). It won’t divide readers over doctrinal differences. And the content will be consistent with the Bible—it won’t gloss over sin, but it won’t be a how-to manual either. Great Christian fiction leaves the reader feeling they’ve learned an eternal truth about God or how we can know Him better.

How do you define Christian fiction? By the author? The publisher? The intended reader? The content? #BookishQuestion #ChristianFiction Click To Tweet

Here are some blog posts which go into more detail:

What about you? How do you define Christian fiction?

It seemed he was a perfectly reasonable man, to anyone not attempting to court his daughter.

Book Review | The Judge’s Daughter by Nerys Leigh

The Judge’s Daughter is the seventh book in Nerys Leigh’s Escape to the West series. George Parsons met and fell for Millicent in one of the earlier books in the series, after Millicent travelled to the small California town of Green Hill Creek to escape her abusive husband. Now George is heading to New York City to renew his relationship with Millicent.

I have read all the earlier books in the series but can’t actually remember the circumstances which brought Millicent to Green Hill Creek, although I do vaguely remember the start of their relationship. No matter. That’s not what The Judge’s Daughter is about, and it’s not even set in Green Hill Creek.

The new setting means new characters—Millicent’s mother, who is friendly and amenable to George’s pursuit of their daughter. And Millicent’s father, the judge, who is a lot less friendly. There are also the adorable/annoying children he meets at the train station, some of many who struggle to survive in New York.

It’s great to see a romance between an older couple. It’s especially great to see a romance with a divorced woman in a time when divorce was frowned upon by most of polite society. Being older, George and Millicent knew themselves and their own minds better. But they still had to content with the overprotective father (although he had good reason to be), and their own differences in upbringing and expectations. I enjoyed that, and I enjoyed (as always) the humour and the Christian elements.

The Judge’s Daughter is another fun romance from Nerys Leigh. I recommend it for fans of Christian historical romance, especially westerns.

Thanks to the author for providing a free ebook for review.

About Nerys Leigh

Nerys LeighNerys Leigh writes thoroughly romantic Christian historical love stories. She loves heroes who are strong but sweet and heroines who are willing to fight for the life they want.

She’s from the UK, which you would think puts her in a unique position to not write about mail order brides in the American west, but the old adage of writing what you know has never appealed to her. She has an actual American read each book before publishing to make sure she hasn’t gone all English on it.

No One’s Bride is the first in the Escape to the West series which tells the stories of a group of women willing to travel across America to find happiness, and the men determined to win their hearts.

You can find Nerys Leigh online at:

Website | Facebook

About The Judge’s Daughter

After being a widower for almost half his life, fifty-one-year-old George Parsons didn’t count on ever falling for a woman again, until Millicent came along. After meeting her in his tiny home town of Green Hill Creek, he’s smitten. So when Millie asks him to visit her in New York, he doesn’t hesitate to make the week-long journey from California to see her again.

But what was easy in Green Hill Creek seems next to impossible in the city, and in the midst of the ostentatious wealth and desperate poverty of 1870 New York, George will have to overcome snobbery, prejudice and danger to win Millie’s heart.

Find The Judge’s Daughter online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Goodreads

You can read the introduction to The Judge’s Daughter below:

And don’t forget to click here to check out my Amazon shop for my top picks in Christian fiction!

First Line Friday

First Line Friday | Week 88 | The Encircled Anthology

It’s First Line Friday! That means it’s time to pick up the nearest book and quote the first line. Today I’m sharing from Beyond the Stars, Past the Moons by Jebraun Clifford, one of the stories in the Encircled anthology:

First line from "“Beyond the Stars, Past the Moons” by Jebraun Clifford: I have less than one hour to live.

 

What’s the book nearest you, and what’s the first line?

About Encircled

Experience six of the world’s most beloved stories in a whole new light! From historical to futuristic, these retellings will take you to an enchanted forest, a cursed castle, and far beyond. Uncover secrets of a forbidden basement, a hypnotic gift, and a mysterious doll. Fall in love with a lifelong friend or brand-new crush. Venture to unknown lands on a quest to save a prince, a kingdom, or maybe even a planet. With moments of humor, suspense, romance, and adventure, Encircled has something to offer every fan of fairy tales, both classic and reimagined.

You can find Encircled online at

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Apple Books | Barnes & Noble| Kobo

Click the button to check out what my fabulous fellow FirstLineFriday bloggers are sharing today:

You can then click the link which will take you to the master page of all this week’s #FirstLineFriday posts.

And you can click here to check out my previous FirstLineFriday posts.

Share your first line in the comments, and happy reading!

And don’t forget to click here to check out my Amazon shop for my top picks in Christian fiction!

Given the choice between the gods our people venerated on that hill and the God who offers shelter for even the most undeserving, I know whom I choose.

Book Review | Shelter of the Most High by Connilyn Cossette

This is the second novel in Connilyn Cossette’s Cities of Refuge series. While it is a standalone novel, the backstory will make more sense if you read A Light on the Hill first.

After Sofea and Prezi’s families are murdered in a pirate raid, they are taken from their home on Sicily to Israel. A series of events leads them to Israel, to the city of Kadesh, one of the ancient Hebrew Cities of Refuge. Here they are taken in by Moriyah, who runs the inn (and who was the main character in A Light on the Hill).

The opening chapters are full of action, but it felt like the story took a long time to get going. I think this is because it takes several chapters before Sofea and Prezi reach Kadesh, and before we meet the hero of the story (I initially thought the hero was one of the pirates, but I was wrong).

Etian is Moriyah’s adopted son, and the reason he and Moriyah have both been banished to Kadesh. As Sofea learns the local language and settles in Kadesh, she and Etian fall for each other … but Sofea is a child of the sea and Etian can’t leave the city to take her to the sea. The result is I found the second half of the book wasn’t as strong, as it focused on a suspense thread at the expense of the characters.

There is also (unsurprisingly) a strong faith thread in Shelter of the Most High, as both Sofea and Prezi learn about the Yahweh, the Hebrew One God, and the way he cares for his people. Recommended for Biblical fiction fans.

Thanks to Bethany House and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

About Connilyn Cossette

Connilyn Cossette is the Christy Award Nominated and CBA-Bestselling author of the Out from Egypt Series from Bethany House Publishers. There’s not much she enjoys more than digging into the rich, ancient world of the Bible, discovering new gems of grace that point to Jesus, and weaving them into an immersive fiction experience.

Find Connilyn Cossette online at:

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter

About Shelter of the Most High

The daughter of a pagan high priest, Sofea finds solace from her troubles in the freedom of the ocean. But when marauders attack her village on the island of Sicily, she and her cousin are taken across the sea to the shores of Canaan.

Eitan has lived in Kedesh, a City of Refuge, for the last eleven years, haunted by a tragedy in his childhood and chafing at the boundaries placed on him. He is immediately captivated by Sofea, but revealing his most guarded secret could mean drawing her into the danger of his past.

As threats from outside the walls loom and traitors are uncovered within, Sofea and Eitan are plunged into the midst of a murder plot. Will they break free from the shackles of the past in time to uncover the betrayal and save their lives and the lives of those they love?

Find Shelter of the Most High online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | ChristianBook | Koorong

You can read the introduction to Shelter of the Most High below:

Introducing the Encircled Anthology (and #Giveaway)

Today’s post is part of a blog tour to launch the Encircled Anthology, which I’m looking forward to reading. And there are preorder goodies, and a giveaway!

About Encircled

Experience six of the world’s most beloved stories in a whole new light! From historical to futuristic, these re-tellings will take you to an enchanted forest, a cursed castle, and far beyond. Uncover secrets of a forbidden basement, a hypnotic gift, and a mysterious doll. Fall in love with a lifelong friend or brand-new crush. Venture to unknown lands on a quest to save a prince, a kingdom, or maybe even a planet. With moments of humor, suspense, romance, and adventure, Encircled has something to offer every fan of fairy tales, both classic and re-imagined.

This anthology features stories from S.E. Clancy, Jebraun Clifford, J.M. Hackman, E.J. Kitchens, Laurie Lucking, and Tori V. Rainn.

You can find Encircled online at

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Apple Books | Barnes & Noble| Kobo

Preorder Goodies

 

Everyone who preorders Encircled (that’s me!) can get a pack of preorder goodies, courtesy of Jebraun Clifford. Click here to find out more.

Giveaway!

The Ever Afters have teamed up with the Just-Us League to host an epic giveaway celebrating their upcoming fairy tale anthologies! Enter for a chance to win one of FOUR sets of prizes!

Grand Prize (U.S. residents only)

  • Two paperbacks (Fractured Ever After and Encircled)
  • Book cozy
  • Slipper ornament
  • 3D-printed bookmark (pick one design)
  • Set of four signed illustration prints

First Prize (U.S. residents only)

  • Two paperbacks (Fractured Ever After and Encircled)
  • “Fairy tales do come true” charm bracelet
  • 3D-printed bookmark (pick one design)
  • Set of four signed illustration prints

Second Prize (international)

  • Two ebooks (Fractured Ever After and Encircled)
  • 3D-printed bookmark (pick one design)
  • Set of four signed illustration prints

Third Prize (international)

  • Two ebooks (Fractured Ever After and Encircled)
  • Choice of 3D-printed bookmark (pick one design) *or* set of four signed illustration
    prints

Click here to enter via Rafflecopter

About the Authors

SE Clancy

An adrenaline junkie, S.E. Clancy has skydived, worked as a 9-1-1 dispatcher, and raised two daughters with her husband of over 25 years in Northern California. A bit of a sci-fi nerd, geek, and self-proclaimed dork, there isn’t much she won’t try at least once … unless it involves mayonnaise, because that stuff is just gross. Her debut novella, “True: A Contemporary Retelling of Rahab,” released March 14, 2019.

Website │ Facebook │ Twitter │ Instagram

About Jebraun Clifford

Too short to be an elf and too tall to be a Hobbit, Jebraun Clifford lives smack-dab in the centre of New Zealand’s North Island surrounded by thermal activity, stunning lakes, and enough Redwoods to make her Californian heart swoon. She writes about discovering identity and living without fear and enjoys creating fantastic worlds. She loves coffee, tree ferns, dark chocolate, and Jesus, and harbours a secret penchant for British spelling.

Website │ Facebook │ Twitter │ Instagram

About JM Hackman

J.M. Hackman loves thunderstorms, bookstores, and happy endings. She’s never met a reading nook she didn’t like and prefers soul talk to small talk. When she’s not writing or reading, she spends quality time with her greatest fans—her family. Her stories have been published in the anthologies Realmscapes, Mythical Doorways, and Tales of Ever After. Her award-winning YA fantasy Spark (The Firebrand Chronicles) was released in 2017 from L2L2 Publishing. The sequel, Flare, was released in February 2019. She spends her days writing stories, consuming massive quantities of dark chocolate, and looking for portals to other worlds.

Website │ Newsletter │ Facebook │ Instagram

About EJ Kitchens

E.J. Kitchens loves tales of romance, adventure, and happily-ever-afters and strives to write such tales herself. When she’s not thinking about dashing heroes or how awesome bacteria are—she is a microbiologist after all—she’s taking photos, ballroom dancing, or talking about classic books and black-and-white movies. She is the author of the fantasy novels The Rose and the Wand and To Catch a Magic Thief and the short stories “How to Hide a Prince” (Tales of Ever After anthology) and “The Seventh Crown.”

Website │ Facebook │ Twitter │ Pinterest

About Laurie Lucking

An avid reader practically since birth, Laurie Lucking discovered her passion for writing after leaving her career as an attorney to become a stay-at-home mom. When she gets a break from playing superheroes with her two young sons, she writes young adult fantasy with a strong thread of fairy tale romance. Her debut novel, Common, won third place in the CWRC Reader’s Choice Literary Lighthouse Awards, and her short story, “Threshold,” was published in a Fellowship of Fantasy anthology titled Mythical Doorways. A Midwestern girl through and through, she currently lives in Minnesota.

Website │ Facebook │ Twitter │ Instagram

About Tori V Rainn

Tori V. Rainn was born and raised in Texas. In her late teens, she became a writer in 2011 when she took a writer’s course at Writer’s Village University. If she’s not working on novellas or novels, she can easily be distracted with coming up with her next big short story adventure. Several of her short stories have been featured in online magazines—links of stories can be found on her Facebook author page. When she’s not writing, she enjoys knife collecting and running. Tea and chocolate are her addictions. Video games, books, music, and movies are her outlet. She’s a Christ follower and Realm Makers member.

Website │ Facebook │ Twitter │ Pinterest

Bookish Question: What's your view on grammatical errors in novels?

Bookish Question #103 | What’s your view on grammatical errors in novels?

I’m a freelance fiction editor, which means I spent hours each day hunting through my client’s manuscripts and correcting errors. That can make it hard to switch off and not notice errors when I read for pleasure.

But there are different kinds of errors.

I’m not bothered if an author uses US spelling or grammar vs. British English. I do get annoyed if they don’t seem to be consistent.

I can forgive the odd who/whom error—it’s something even editors look up.

It annoys me if an author doesn’t use the Oxford comma, but that’s not necessarily an error. It’s merely a difference of opinion.

I’m usually not bothered by errors in the books I review.

Usually. This is because I’m often reviewing ARCs. ARCs are advance review copies, which are sent out before the final proofreading is completed. If I find errors in these books, I assume it will be found and corrected before it goes to print. (I’m less forgiving if the author or publisher makes a point of saying they’ve sent me the final version.)

I’m also used to seeing a lot of formatting errors in the review copies.

That’s because my review copies are electronic. The publisher uploads a pdf file to NetGalley, and that’s automatically converted to a mobi file which NetGalley email to my Kindle. The automatic conversion process often introduces errors, like missing line or page breaks.

What I find more difficult are the errors which take me out of the story.

For example, I was recently reading a story where the spelling of one character’s name changed several times (e.g. Smith to Smyth and back to Smith). That confused me to the point I actually found myself flicking back through the book to find whether Smyth was a new character or not (he was not). That’s annoying, but it’s just a proofreading error. They happen.

Other times I’ll get distracted by the errors because the characters and story haven’t engaged me.

Those are the most annoying—when I start picking up on minor errors because that’s more interesting than reading what is happening to the characters. That’s often the sign of a story that’s been written and published too quickly, a story that hasn’t gone through enough critiquing and beta reading and editing.

These are the stories that end up on my did-not-finish pile. I’d persevere if the story was good (although I’d probably still mention the errors if I reviewed the book).

But I’ve come to realise life is too short to read bad books, so if the story and characters don’t engage me, then it’s a DNF.

What about you? What’s your view on grammatical errors in novels? Do you notice them? Do they bother you?

First Line Friday

First Line Friday | Week 87 | A Silken Thread by Kim Vogel Sawyer

It’s First Line Friday! That means it’s time to pick up the nearest book and quote the first line. Today I’m sharing from A Silken Thread by Kim Vogel Sawyer:

First line from A Silken Thread: Laurel swung her feet from the armrest of the sofa to the floor and sat up.

I love the cover, but I have to say that’s not the most exciting first line, but should we judge an entire book by the first line? Have you read A Silken Thread? What did you think?

What’s the book nearest you, and what’s the first line?

About A Silken Thread:

For readers who love a heartwarming romance and a rich historical setting comes a tale of a young woman with a heavy burden, the International Cotton Exposition, and the pursuit of true love.

Eighteen-year-old Laurel Millard, youngest of seven children, is expected to stay home and “take care of Mama” by her older siblings, but Laurel has dreams of starting her own family. Operating a silk loom at the Atlanta Exposition will give her the chance to capture the heart of a man wealthy enough to take care of Laurel and any children she might bear, as well as her mother.

Langdon Rochester’s parents have given him an ultimatum: settle down with a wife or lose his family inheritance. At the Exposition, Langdon meets Laurel. Marrying her would satisfy his parents’s command, she would look lovely on his arm for social events, and in her besotted state, he believes she would overlook him continuing pursuing rowdy adventures with his unmarried buddies. Langdon decides to woo Laurel. Willie Sharp is not well-off and must take on an extra job at the Atlanta Exposition as a security guard. When mischief-makers cause trouble in the Women’s Building, Willie is put in charge of keeping the building secure. He enjoys visiting with Laurel, who seems like the little sister he never had, but his feelings for Laurel change to something much deeper. Can Willie convince Laurel that he can give her better life–even with so little to offer?

You can find A Silken Thread online at:

Amazon US | Amazon AU | ChristianBook | Goodreads | Koorong

Click the button to check out what my fabulous fellow FirstLineFriday bloggers are sharing today:

You can then click the link which will take you to the master page of all this week’s #FirstLineFriday posts.

And you can click here to check out my previous FirstLineFriday posts.

Share your first line in the comments, and happy reading!

And don’t forget to click here to check out my Amazon shop for my top picks in Christian fiction!

Quote from Shadows of Hope: He wasn't an adulterous man, not really. Not in the ways that mattered.

#ThrowbackThursday | Shadows of Hope by Georgiana Daniels

It’s Throwback Thursday! Today I’m resharing my review of Shadows of Hope by Georgiana Daniels. This novel impressed me because it felt real—real characters making real mistakes, leaving them with real problems and no easy answers. I’d never describe the ending as happy, because there is no way to have a happy ending to this dilemma without killing off some characters (which writers often do, but which can feel like cheating as I read).

Shadows of Hope is not the feel-good romance novel I usually read and review.

Instead, it’s a thoroughly modern novel where messed-up characters have to wade the confusing waters of consequences, and there is no trite or easy answer with no convenient divorces or deaths.

Marissa is forty, infertile, and wants a baby—a want made worse by working in a pregnancy resource centre, and being married to a man she suspects of wandering. Kaitlyn is the barista at Marissa’s favourite coffee shop, a twenty-six year-old college student who is secretly dating one of her professors. Colin is a biology professor who breaks off his illicit relationship as he finds out he’s up for tenure. Now if only she’d stop trying to contact him …

Kaitlyn discovers she’s pregnant, but Colin has broken it off and she can’t tell him. She does tell Marissa, not realising she’s Colin’s wife. But we know, and that one small secret drives much of the tension. When will Marissa find out? What will she do when she does? How will she cope in the meantime?

 

The writing was excellent.

The author delves into the emotions of three people who’ve all made mistakes in their relationships, mistakes which mean there is no easy answer, no possible ending that will satisfy everyone. The story wasn’t predictable, and I liked that because it felt authentic in a way a feel-good romance ending would have felt contrived and false.

The spiritual aspects were also interesting: Marissa and Kaitlyn were both raised as Christians, but both fell away from the church. Marissa got more involved in church after she married, but Colin never did (which caused some friction). Interesting …

Recommended for those who enjoy contemporary Christian fiction that deals with the real-life issues that don’t have easy answers.

Thanks to Barbour Publishing and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

About Georgiana Daniels

Author Photo: Georgiana DanielsAs a Christian author and homeschooling mom, my life is random and often chaotic—but abundantly blessed! I’m the wife of a super-charged husband and the mother of three high-energy daughters, and as such I’ve become a master at spinning plates—until they crash and I remember how much I need God’s grace. The journey is filled with both good times and extraordinary challenges, and now I’d like to peel back the curtain and share some of it with you!

Whether you’re a reader who desires fiction where the characters’ lives are challenged in unimaginable ways, or you’re a writer who needs a little encouragement—I have a heart for you!

My hope is that you’ll be inspired and motivated. Motivated to love more and live bigger no matter what’s happening. Because I get it…I know that life doesn’t always turn out the way we plan. But we can trust there’s a bigger plan at work!

Come along and join me for real life…real hope…real fiction.

You can find Georgiana Daniels online at:

Website | Facebook | Google+ | Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter

About Shadows of Hope

A story of hope in the aftermath of inconceivable betrayal and broken dreams
What if. . .

. . .you struggled with infertility but unknowingly befriended your husband’s pregnant mistress?

What if. . .

. . .the woman you were seeing behind your wife’s back gets pregnant, threatening your job and marriage?

What if. . .

. . .your boyfriend never told you he was married and you discover you’re pregnant?

Crisis pregnancy worker Marissa Moreau suspects her husband is cheating, but little does she know how close to home her husband’s infidelity hits. College student Kaitlyn Farrows is floundering after a relationship with her professor leaves her pregnant. Soon she lands a job and a support system at the local pregnancy resource center and things seem to be turning around. But when Marissa and Kaitlyn become friends, neither one knows they share a connection—Colin, Marissa’s husband and Kaitlyn’s former professor. When their private lives collide, the two women must face the ultimate test of their faith and choose how to move forward as they live in the shadows of hope.

You can find Shadows of Hope online at:

Amazon | ChristianBook | Goodreads | Koorong

You can read the introduction to Shadows of Hope below: